Relationship & Sleep

How Your Relationship Can Be Affected By How Much You Sleep?

Section 1: Sleep and Your Relationship

Section 2: When Lack of Sleep Leads to Arguments

Section 3: How Much Sleep is Necessary?

Section 4: How You Can Get More Sleep Easier?

Section 5: Conclusion

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How Your Relationship Can Be Affected By How Much You Sleep?

Section 1: Sleep and Your Relationship

To have a healthy relationship, the two of you have to be on the same page. "Any relationship with a great sense of transparency and communication goes out the window when we're sleep deprived," Renee Leckinger, PhD, a licensed clinical psychologist and founder of Renee Leckinger Associates, tells Bustle. It's one thing to be normal and grouchy, but not being able to stop overthinking a situation and cause the relationship to suffer is cause for concern. "If you are sleep deprived, and your partner tries to make an important gesture, you'll feel drained and will react in ways that may or may not be positive," Dr. Leckinger says. "We often let our minds control us when we're sleep deprived and we don't fully consider all the ramifications of our actions.

Section 2: When Lack of Sleep Leads to Arguments

"If you're up all night dealing with your spouse, you're going to have a harder time getting through the next day. The 'focus on the mistake, not the person' thing takes over," de Albergaria tells Bustle. "[You're] going to take what you perceive as a slight against you as a giant offense." Your partner is going to need to try harder to win your trust back. That might involve avoiding certain words and actions that you find offensive. And that's going to require extra effort. "Relationships get through an initial bump by communication," de Albergaria says. "If you don't want to communicate with them, you might want to think twice about being in a relationship." When Lack of Sleep Leads to Criticism "When we don't get enough sleep, we get cranky and reactionary," de Albergaria says.

Section 3: How Much Sleep is Necessary?

Sleeping from a range of 6 to 9 hours is considered ideal for women, and 7 to 9 for men. "The amount of sleep that's appropriate will depend on a person's age and genetics. We know that when it comes to our physical health and overall wellness, sleep needs change over time," Daniel Smith, a sleep physician and assistant professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in an interview.

Section 4: How You Can Get More Sleep Easier?

Sneak a "bedtime hour" into your schedule, and stick to it. You can be flexible on other hours but if you want to beat insomnia, just build that part of your day around an ideal wake-up time. Don't let bedtime slip again after you've made a change. Here's how. Make room for exercise in your routine—even if it's just 10 minutes per day. Find ways to get some sunlight each day. Create a plan that helps you to relax before bed. (Here are some helpful ideas.) If you can't get outside, use a meditation app that helps you to just drift off. (Here's one I like.) Make sleep part of your conversation. Have your partner help you think about bedtime and help you set limits so you can get at least seven hours of sleep. Set small goals that are attainable over time.

Section 5: Conclusion

While I definitely don't suggest drastically changing your sleep schedule to spend more time with your partner, there are steps you can take to make the quality of your time together less sleep-dependent. Instead of expecting your partner to be up when you're asleep, give them the option to stay in bed. Make a bed for them and tuck them in, or check their eyelids periodically to make sure they're not trying to sneak out. This helps maintain a more relaxing atmosphere in your relationship by ensuring that your partner is free to let their guard down and relax, even if they're asleep. Once your partner starts waking you up for snuggles, it's time to reevaluate your relationship and whether it can be better balanced and healthier.

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